Winter Pho Soup

Like much of the country, we’ve been hunkering down in absolutely frigid temperatures, facing daily threads of ice storms.  Parents don’t know what to plan from one day to the next since school closures come early in the morning with the slightest inkling of risk.

It hasn’t stopped me from getting out and exploring the Austin area.

On my latest foray to the Asian Market  at the Chinatown Center  I stocked up on all sorts of long missed spoils.  Browsing the aisles I found my favorite mushroom soy sauce and Chinkiang vinegar, a wonderful black rice vinegar.

The produce section displayed a stack of plump baby bok choy, bags of crisp mung bean sprouts, and a stunning mound of fresh shiitake mushrooms. When I spotted oxtails in the meat case, I knew that it was time for some serious soup making and nothing pleased me more than the idea of a steamy bowl of Pho.

pho union sq blog

There was a whole shelf of various types of pho seasonings and I opted for a box with disposable bags, reminiscent of the sort I enjoyed while in Miami. Pho condiments IMG_1215

A day ahead, I cooked and chilled the incredibly simple Oxtail Soup stock (included below).  The kitchen smelled delicious as it simmered away on the back of the stove, and in less than two hours I had an effortless, rich, and flavorful stock.

This soup takes no time to assemble.  I took Ming Tsai’s suggestion from Blue Ginger, and made a refreshing salad with bean sprouts and herbs to further season the soup.  Although rice sticks are the preferred noodle, we had a good supply of fresh somen noodles on hand that worked out fine and only needed a moment to be warmed in the hot soup.   We also had grilled beef left from our Super Bowl Summer Roll Spree which proved a tasty topping for our hot bowls filled with steamy Pho soup.

Pho, Vietnamese Beef-Noodle Soup with Vegetables

 Ingredients 

Soup Base 

  • 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 Tbsp. ginger, peeled and minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 onion, peeled and sliced lengthwise
  • 2 serrano chili peppers, seeded and minced
  • 1 carrot, peeled and thinly sliced at an angle
  • 5 oz. shiitake mushrooms, cleaned, trimmed and sliced (2 cups)
  • salt and pepper
  • 1 Tbsp. dark soy sauce
  • 8 cups rich beef or oxtail stock
  • 1 bag Pho seasoning or in a cheesecloth bag: 6 whole cloves, 2 star anise, and 1 cinnamon stick

Soup Additions

  •  6 to 8 oz. rice stick noodles
  • 1½  lb. baby bok choy, cut in half lengthwise
  • 8 oz. lean raw tender beef, thinly sliced (tenderloin, sirloin, etc.)

Bean Sprout Salad

  • 2 cups mung bean sprouts, rinsed and drained
  • ½ cup Thai basil leaves, chopped
  • ¼ cup mint, chopped
  • 3 green onions, chopped
  • 1 Tbsp. Thai fish sauce   (nam pla)
  • 2 limes, juice

Additional garnishes:  sliced serrano peppers, basil or mint leaves, sesame oil, lime wedges, fish or sriracha sauce.

Directions

  1. For the soup base:  in a soup pot, sauté the oil with the ginger and garlic until aromatic;  add the onions and toss to soften, then add the peppers, the carrots, the mushrooms, and season lightly with salt and pepper.  Add the reserved beef,  soy sauce, the stock, and the pho seasoning.  Simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or until the stock is well flavored with the seasoning.
  2.  Meanwhile, soak the rice stick noodles in warm water for about 20 minutes.
  3.  For the Beans Sprout Salad, just before serving, combine the bean sprouts with the herbs and onions.  Combine the fish sauce and the limes toss the salad lightly.
  4.  To finish the soup, remove the pho seasoning bag, add the bok choy;  simmer briefly, until the base of the bok choy is barely tender, 1-2 minutes.  Add the rice noodles to warm them.
  5.  On the table, include additional sliced serrano peppers, basil or mint leaves, sesame oil, lime wedges, fish, soy, or sriracha sauce.
  6.  To serve, arrange bean sprouts in wide bowls, add a ladle of hot soup including noodles and vegetables, lay a few slices of beef on top, and finish with a favorite condiments.

Easy Oxtail Stock

  • 1 ½ – 2 lbs. oxtail, sections, rinsed and patted dry
  • 1 medium onion, cut into large chunks
  • 2 ribs celery
  • salt to taste

Bring oxtail to a boil in about 8 cups water.  Remove the brown scum that floats to the top and continue simmer for 1 hour.  Add onion, cook ½ hour; add celery and cook 15 minutes longer; salt to taste.  Strain the liquid, reserve the oxtails and chill well.  When cold, the stock will be thick and gelatinous; remove the layer of fat on stop. Pick the meat from the bones and reserve for soup, if desired.

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