About Bananas, Psychologically Speaking

I don’t know about you, but I seem to constantly struggle with too many over-ripe bananas. After all these years, you’d think I would have figured out how to realistically manage the inflow and outflow of bananas.  Maybe a life-cycle chart would help.  Or perhaps there’s an app that can tell me when to buy more bananas.

Try as I might, I can’t quite get the purchase and consumption of bananas to come out even.  There are times at the market when I will hover over them, remind self of the likely outcome, then staunchly throw my head back and move on―empty handed.

Just as often though, I will linger over the bananas a tad too long. I’ll pick up a bunch and feel the surge of tension―I have more at home but I’m buying them anyway.  I refuse to accept that there will be dark bananas days ahead.

I tell myself past-their-prime bananas are good.  I should be grateful.

Border-line Bananas

Border-line Bananas

They are sweeter and more nutritious than their younger, firmer predecessors, especially in smoothies and other juice drinks.  We know they are richer in potassium, which helps with high blood pressure, osteoporosis and stroke; they have increased vitamin B-6 which lessens rheumatoid arthritis, depression and heart disease; and they contain plenty of soluble and insoluble fibers, helpful in preventing obesity and hypertension.

Nevertheless, those same youthful bananas continue to sit, gain spots, and grow black.  Likely as not, they will be relegated to the freezer, deferred for another day.  Recently, I was back in that same predicament: what to do with more sagging bananas. Here’s my latest solution for 2 (just) small very ripe bananas.  Good news: it continues to keep on giving for several days, long enough to stop buying bananas for a while.

This Banana Swirl Bread is inspired by Banana Cinnamon Bread at Goodeats.com.  It’s as close as you can get to easy banana-scented cinnamon rolls – but instead of the usual heavy dose of butter there’s only a dash of olive oil.

Banana Swirl BreadLike most yeast breads, there is the rising time to consider. The dough is so well constructed I didn’t even bother to pull out my mixer and opted to stir it up by hand.

Once it has risen the dough rolls out in a flash; it’s sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar and shaped into a loaf for another quick rise.

While the bread bakes, the air is filled with scents of tropical bananas and cinnamon―an unbeatable combination.  The hardest part is waiting for the bread to cool before cutting.  It slices beautifully revealing a gorgeous, pale yellow loaf etched throughout with a cinnamon-brown sugar spiral.

It is delicious sliced and eaten straight up, but there are those who will want to toast it and further glorify it with butter.  I suspect it would make amazing French toast, too. Stay tuned for Episode Two.

Banana Swirl Bread

Inspired by Donna Currie’s Bread Baking:  Banana Cinnamon Bread at  www.seriouseats.com

Ingredients

½ cup lukewarm water
1 packet quick rise yeast
½ cup mashed very ripe bananas (2 small)
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup plain yogurt, Greek-style preferably
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla extract
2-3/4 cup bread flour or all purpose flour; divided
1 Tbsp olive oil
Cinnamon-sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 tbsp cinnamon

Directions 

  1. In large mixing bowl, combine the warm water, the yeast, and a pinch of the sugar; let stand about 10 minutes to activate yeast and become bubbly.
  2. Meanwhile, mash the bananas and add to them the remaining sugar, yogurt, salt, vanilla and a heaping cup of the flour. Combine and add to the yeast mixture, stirring to incorporate.   Add another heaping cup of flour (reserving the rest for the kneading process) along with the olive oil and continue mixing until it forms a smooth mass.  If using a bread hook, continue to beat and incorporate most of the flour until it is smooth and elastic.
  3. If finishing by hand, turn dough out onto floured board, kneading briefly to incorporate remainder of the flour and the dough is silky and elastic.
  4. Place the dough in clean, well oiled bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover, and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  5. Meanwhile spray a 9×5” or similar pan with oil. Combine the brown sugar and cinnamon and set aside.
  6. When dough is light, flour the board, turn it out, punch it down and knead it briefly to release air. Roll the dough out to 9”x15” rectangle.  Spread the cinnamon-sugar evenly over the dough, leaving a 3” unsugared edge on the far 9” end.
  7. Roll the dough up, jelly roll fashion, to form a 9” long log. Pinch the unsugared end and seal. Tuck the ends under if necessary and place seam-side down in prepared pan.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  8. Preheat oven to 325 degrees and bake for 35-40 minutes until golden brown, rotating to brown evenly if necessary. Remove loaf from pan and cool completely on rack before cutting.  Yield:  1 loaf.
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