Behind the Curve?

Cream of tartar is one of those odd little pantry ingredients that many of us haven’t a clue what it really does. Beyond stabilizing egg whites when making meringue, what really is its value?

While contemplating a slew of Snickerdoodle recipes recently I was stumped that many included cream of tartar as an essential ingredient. Turns out cream of tartar is an acid that causes a reaction when combined with baking soda. The leavening effect results in soft, chewy, addictive, cookies that you simply cannot leave alone.snickerdoodle (1)

In some circles Snickerdoodles are viewed as an American institution. With such lofty status no wonder they are added to commercial ice cream, as if frosting on a cake.

Their powdery cinnamon-sugar finish makes them iconic, too, so don’t omit.  Since many recipes are quite lavish on that count, the following amount of cinnamon may seem wimpy by serious aficionados.  From my limited perspective they are balanced and need nothing more than a cup of tea or a glass of milk.

Snickerdoodles

Inspired by Lil’ Luna’s Snickerdoodles

Ingredients
1 cup butter (softened)
1½ cups sugar
2 eggs
2 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
Cinnamon-sugar
3 tablespoons sugar
1 tsp. cinnamon

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or silpat.
  2. Sift together flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, and salt.
  3. In a mixing bowl beat the butter until light, slowly add the sugar and beat until fluffy. Mix in the eggs one at a time, beating after each addition.
  4. Stir the dry ingredients into the butter mixture and mix well.
  5. In 1 tablespoon scoops, roll the dough into balls, then roll each into the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Place 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet.
  6. Bake for 8-10 minutes at 350 degrees, until the edges just begin to brown slightly. Carefully remove to rack to cool. They will be fragile, but firm up as they cool.  Yield: about 48 cookies.
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