Cheese Synergy

On the page, there is really nothing very remarkable about this cheese.  Paneer is a bland cheese made popular in Indian cuisine. It is a vehicle designed to bring dishes to life through its absorption of complex spice and flavor combinations.

Paneer is one of the easiest and most rewarding in my (fairly limited) repertoire of homemade cheeses. You can have your cheese fix in three hours.

Spiced Paneer

Bring some milk to a boil, add the juice of a couple of lemons to expedite the curdling process, and you are on your way. In all of its simplicity, this cow’s milk variety is reminiscent of a highly crafted goat cheese. No, it is not a creamy cheese, and oddly, its mouth feel is slightly dry.

But if you take a few exotic spices and throw them into the mix, something happens.  It could be that I am a huge fan of coriander seeds… give it another dimension with red pepper flakes and freshly ground black pepper.  Add a little fresh garlic chives, a nice dash of salt and that is it.

Once it drains and curds form, press briefly to mold it into shape. Give it a quick chill to solidify and allow flavors to blend.  If you can wait, it’s even better the next day!

Yes, paneer is a real team player. You could say Spiced Paneer is a case of the whole being greater than the sum of its parts.  It needs nothing else… maybe a cracker or two.

Spiced Paneer

Inspired by Panfusion’s Spiced Paneer @ Food52.com

Ingredients
½ gallon whole milk (preferably not ultra-pasteurized)
20 black peppercorns crushed well
2 tablespoons freshly crushed coriander seeds
2 dried chile peppers, seeded, crushed
½ cup lemon juice
2 teaspoon sea salt
1-2 teaspoons garlic chives, chopped
Tools: colander, flat spatula, cheesecloth

Instructions

  1. Rinse a large pot with water and pour in the milk; add the peppercorns and coriander, and place it over medium high heat. Stirring with a flat bottom spatula, bring to a full boil.  Gently stir in the lemon juice and remove from heat.  Let stand undisturbed to allow it to separate into curds, which will take about 10 minutes. Meanwhile line a colander with cheesecloth and place it over a bowl to catch the whey.
  2. Pour the curdled mixture into the cheesecloth lined colander and allow to drain. When the liquid has drained through, carefully, bring the corners of the cloth together to bring the curds together in a mass, drain for 10-20 minutes longer.
  3. When the curds have stopped dripping, give it a good squeeze to remove any further whey. Gently stir in the salt and redistribute any spices that may have shifted to the bottom.
  4. Shape the mass into a flat round or oval and firmly rewrap in the cheesecloth. Set the cheese on a drainable surface (like a sushi mat) and weigh it down with a heavy pot filled with water or a couple of cans. Let it stand undisturbed at room temperature for 2 hours.
  5. Remove the cheesecloth and gently reshape the cheese into an attractive log or oval.  Cover with clean cheesecloth and firmly wrap with plastic wrap.  Chill for 2 hours or preferably overnight to allow the paneer to solidify. Yield: about 10 oz.

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