Breathe, savor, smile

Why do you cook?  Because you are hungry?  Because you like to eat and feed others?  Maybe you have too much zucchini. There are plenty of reasons why we cook…

Cooking is my therapy, it’s a form of meditation.  I can get lost in the repetitive process of chopping, stirring, or kneading; it zones me out and relaxes. I like to think I’m a better person because I cook… but that’s purely subjective.

Then, we get to enjoy the fruits of our labor, the results of all this cooking. Eating is our big reward.  Before a meal I like to set the table and arrange the food so that it is visually appealing. There are times when I’m famished or in a hurry and need a reminder to take a deep breath and slow down.

When I seriously savor my food I know I eat less and enjoy it more.  Such is the case with a recent batch of transformative Fig Bars.  Though nothing fancy, they are definitely meant for savoring.

Odd-shaped dried figs have a perfumed honey flavor with little seeds that can be distracting.

Peculiar dried figs

However, when  teamed with complementary partners they magically morph into something far different. Once baked, you realize these mysterious understated little packages are well worth a meditative moment.

At first bite, the bar is reminiscent of a well-built brownie. Notice how it shatters on top. But there’s no butter here and no heavy hit of chocolate—merely enough cocoa to create a balanced, ethereal union with the figs.

Fig Cocoa Bars

A citrusy bite of orange punctuates and brings the flavors fully alive. The center is moist and slightly gooey, thanks to those crazy dried figs, the seeds fade and blend beautifully with the candied walnuts.

There are times when sweets fill a momentary gap: a quick breakfast bite, perhaps a snack during the day or an easy dessert. These bars provide all that plus a good dose of fiber, nutrition and energy.

While you are at it, take a moment to breathe, savor, and smile.

Fig Cocoa Bars

Ingredients
2 eggs, room temperature
½ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup brown sugar
1 tsp vanilla
1 cup less 2 Tbsp flour
2 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp salt
1 Tbsp grated orange zest
1 cup dried figs, chopped (approx. 10 medium )
½ cup candied walnuts, chopped

Directions

  1. Coat an 8×8” pan with baking spray or line with non-stick foil. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. In a mixing bowl, beat the eggs until frothy. Slowly add the granulated sugar blending until thick; continue to beat in the brown sugar. Then the vanilla.
  3. Combine the flour, cocoa, baking powder, salt and mix into bowl along with orange zest. Stir in the figs and nuts, don’t over blend.
  4. Spread batter evenly into pan and bake for 30-35 minutes until top is evenly browned but not overbaked. Cool for 10 minutes. Cut into portions while warm. Yield: about 15 bars.

Ice Storm Satisfaction

This past week the entire country was hit by severe winter storms. We haven’t been spared here in Oregon either. For over a day now, ice storms  have caused sporadic power outages throughout the region.

Icy Rose Bush

Crashing sounds continue to echo outside, as huge icicles precipitously break and fall thunderously to the ground from their weighty perches. It’s darn cold out there.

An early start this morning called for a late breakfast of warm, luxurious, comfort food. High on my mind, a fabulous block of Cotswold Double Gloucester cheese on standby in the fridge.

Cotswold, Courtesy Amazon.com

Cotswold is a variation of Double Gloucester, a whole cow’s milk cheese made in Gloucestershire County, England where it is revered as a pub cheese.  In my book, it’s not nearly so self-limiting.

This is a unique cheddar-style cheese, pale orange in color and deftly speckled with chives and onions.  Its full herbaceous flavor equally shines on a cheeseboard or teamed with just about anything that agrees with alliums.

Here’s a simple solution that soothed my hungry heart.

Cotwold Pub Sandwich

Call this a starting place: a hot sandwich or cheese-stuffed French toast topped with an egg.  A cheese sandwich of this stature is so startlingly robust it needs little more—perhaps a dab of mayonnaise.

Or, Cheese-Stuffed French Toast

Envelope it all in an eggy batter and simply toast on both sides.  It is exquisite graced with a gooey fried egg.

Cotswold Pub Sandwich (Cheese-Stuffed French Toast)

Ingredients
2 slices sourdough bread
2-3 slices Cotswold Double Gloucester with Onions & Chives cheese
1 tsp mayonnaise or mustard combo
2 eggs, divided
1 Tbsp milk
salt, pepper
1 Tbsp butter, divided

Instructions

  1. Spread the inside slices of bread with mayonnaise. Layer with thick slices of Cotswold cheese.
  2.  In shallow bowl, beat 1 egg with 1 Tbsp milk, and season with salt and pepper.
  3. Place the sandwich in the egg batter and soak for 30 seconds to absorb some of the batter. Turn and repeat.
  4. In hot skillet over medium heat, coat the surface with part of the melted butter.  When hot and bubbly add the sandwich and cook until toasted and cheese softens, approximately 3 minutes per side adding butter as needed. 
  5. Remove sandwich to plate.  If desired, add an egg to buttered skillet; once the white begins to set turn or, add 1 Tbsp water to pan to create steam, cover with lid and cook to set the yolk, another minute or so.
  6. Top the sandwich with a fried egg. Enjoy hot.   Serves 1. 

In Defense of Halloumi

Halloumi has been on my radar for a while now. In truth, it’s not a cheese I was real familiar with because its biggest sales pitch is that it doesn’t melt much. That seemed an oxymoron. Why bother? I’m usually looking for those that are either very hard, fresh, or get all gooey.

But from a cheesemaking point of view, it becomes far more interesting. Halloumi is a fairly basic cheese to make:  set the curds, form into a manageable flat shape, and briefly press to tighten the structure. Then, it goes through a heat process that raises the melting point. It’s salted and often held in a brine solution.

Fresh Halloumi

You are rewarded with a chewy cheese with a fresh mild flavor, a charming squeakiness, and a salty component. Now that is quite a package and enough to challenge feta! Halloumi retains its best qualities when eaten hot or warm. With a little imagination it can easily become the major protein point in a meal.

More good news. Halloumi heats fast while turning golden brown in short order. My latest experiment included cubes as part of a skewered mixture of fast cooking vegetables.

Halloumi Skewers

For even cooking it’s best to select smaller sized mushrooms and cherry tomatoes, and cut sweet onion, pepper, and summer squash into shapes similar in size to the halloumi.  Marinate all in an herbal vinaigrette for 20-30 minutes.

Once skewered and set in a lightly oiled skillet over medium heat  watch carefully and turn, as they brown in 2-3 minutes per side.  I served mine on a bed of warm ley puy lentils along with a few greens, olives, etc.—with warm naan bread and more olive oil for drizzling. Splendid.

Halloumi and Lentils

More info on le puy lentils and a light vinaigrette can be found at Soup and Salad. For those interested, my simplified Halloumi recipe follows, inspired by Gavin Webber’s helpful Halloumi video on YouTube. 

Halloumi

Resized and inspired by Gavin Webber video

Ingredients
10 cups whole milk, homogenized, not ultra-pasteurized
¼ tsp liquid rennet, dilute in ¼ cup water
¼ cup coarse sea salt, approx.

Directions

  1. Heat milk to 86-90° F. Add rennet, stir gently up and down for 1 minute. Cover and rest 30-45 mins to set. Check for a clean break.
  2. To cut curds, cut into ½” cubes with long knife. Rest 5-10 mins to heal the curds.
  3. Slowly heat whey to 104°F, allow about 30 mins. Gently stir curds to keep from matting. Maintain heat for 20 mins; stir occasionally as curds will shrink. Remove pot from heat, cover and rest 10 mins to allow curds to sink.
  4. Drain whey into cheesecloth lined colander, with pot or bowl under to save whey. Wrap with cheesecloth and shape into a ball. Squeeze liquid from curd; turn out with cloth onto large board.
  5. To shape, press and weight, flatten the curd into approx. 1” thick oval, wrap with cloth to firmly hold shape and cover with 2nd board. Weight on top with filled 1 gallon jug for 10 minutes. Turn the flatten curd over, cover with board and press for 20 mins more.
  6. Meanwhile, prepare a draining rack and drainable mat as a holding area.
  7. Cut flattened curd mass into 4 or more wedges.
  8. Heat whey in pot to 180-200° F, skim any detritus (save 2-4 cups for brine). Remove from heat, place curd wedges in near boiling whey and cover until they begin to float, 20-45 mins. If some do not float reheat the whey. Place the cooked wedges on mat to drain a few minutes.
  9. Sprinkle each halloumi wedge all over with ½ tsp fine sea salt. Place on mat to drain 2-4 hours.
  10. For brine, dissolve 2 Tbsp coarse sea salt in 4 cups whey (can be cut with half distilled water).
  11. Store halloumi in closed container, zip lock bag, or covered in brine for up to 60 days. Flavors improve with age.
  12. To fry halloumi, heat skillet over medium heat with a light layer of olive oil. Cook halloumi pieces until golden brown, 2-3 minutes per side.

Let Them Eat Cake!

Back on the blueberry trail again… going into the fall this year’s berry crop was incredibly abundant and they have just kept on coming well into winter.

Blueberries are durable,  so low in maintenance I suspect purveyors and markets love them, too. Packaged well, the nutritious bursts of flavor will hold over 2 weeks in the fridge or freeze easily for later use.

I decided it was time to use up the last of my current supply and opted for a very simple blueberry snack cake.

 

Such a basic little cake, there isn’t really much to it—just enough batter for the luscious berries to reign supreme in a 7” springform or 8”x8” baking pan.

Toppings are optional.  I used a little old-fashioned crumble left from baked apples, but cinnamon-sugar or a sprinkle of turbinado finish it nicely, too.

Blueberry snack cake

It’s the sort of moist, multi-purpose cake that stands in for cheery morning coffeecake, as a sweet afternoon pick-me-up with tea or coffee, or a tempting dessert dabbed with sweetened whipped cream.

Blueberry Snack Cake

Ingredients
1 cup AP flour (or ¾ cup AP + ¼ cup whole wheat flour)
2 tsp baking powder
¼ tsp each salt and nutmeg
1 cup blueberries
1 egg
½ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup butter, melted
Topping Options:  Crumble: 2 Tbsp oats, ¼ tsp cinnamon 3 tsp brown sugar, 2 tsp melted butter; Cinnamon-Sugar: ¼ cup granulated sugar plus 1 tsp cinnamon.  1 Tbsp turbinado sugar; or Confectioners’ sugar.

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray a 7” springform or 8×8” pan with baking spray.
  2. Prepare topping. For Crumble, combine and press all together to form a crumbly mixture.  For Cinnamon Sugar, combine sugar and cinnamon and set aside.
  3. In medium mixing bowl whisk together flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg.  Add the berries.
  4. Separately combine egg, sugar and butter and quickly add to the dry, it will be thick.
  5. Spread into pan and gently level the top.  Sprinkle with topping and bake 35-40 minutes, until it separates from the edges of pan and is set in the center.  Rest on rack for 10 minutes, release and remove springform, cool.  Cut into portions. Dust with confectioners’ sugar. Serves 4-6.

Ode to the Onion

The onion, ready for action

In these early days of 2021 I’m taking a little time to pause and appreciate some of nature’s more mundane gifts. It’s easy to overlook the importance of  unassuming everyday staples.  Consider the ordinary onion: it is always available waiting for its moment to shine, summer or winter. This year the onion is looking even more marvelous in my eyes, thanks to Pablo Neruda’s poetic praise.

Ode to the Onion

by Pablo Neruda

Onion,
luminous flask,
your beauty formed
petal by petal,
crystal scales expanded you
and in the secrecy of the dark earth
your belly grew round with dew.
Under the earth
the miracle happened
and when your clumsy
green stem appeared,
and your leaves were born
like swords
in the garden,
the earth heaped up her power
showing your naked transparency,
and as the remote sea
in lifting the breasts of Aphrodite
duplicating the magnolia,
so did the earth
make you,
onion
clear as the planet
and destined
to shine,
constant constellation,
round rose of water
upon
the table
of the poor.

You make us cry without hurting us.
I have praised everything that exists,
but to me, onion, you are
more beautiful than a bird
of dazzling feathers,
heavenly globe, platinum goblet,
unmoving dance
of the snowy anemone

and the fragrance of the earth lives
in your crystalline nature.

Roasted onion, simple pleasures

How to Roast an Onion

1 medium sweet onion, unpeeled
1 tsp olive oil

Rub the unpeeled skin with olive oil. Bake for 30-40 minutes in hot coals or in 375°F oven, until soft when pressed. The longer it cooks, the softer and sweeter it becomes. Serve hot, cut into smaller wedges. Peel skin ahead or while eating; drizzle with more olive oil,  balsamic vinegar, and salt and pepper.  Enjoy as a side with grilled or roasted entrees.  Serve 1-2.
Use in lieu of caramelized onion in soup, omelets, on pizza or burgers.

Behold, leftovers!

This year, Christmas dinner had its challenges.  With lockdown in place for many of us, we faced a different holiday meal, one without the shared comfort and joy of extended family and friends.

Not terribly hungry, I ended up roasting a supply of vegetables: brussels sprouts, carrots and potatoes. When ready I topped it with sliced ham, a mustard glaze and baked until bubbly. It got the job done—without much flash or flare.  My heart really wasn’t in it.

Pending leftovers

Holidays meals often translate to future soups, stews and snacks.  The uninspired leftovers lingered in the fridge for a couple of days before I considered what to do with them.  I mulled over the possibilities: soup and such just didn’t seem to fit here. Then I recalled a delicious dish that would create a cohesive meal out of all this with little effort on my part.

In a 2014 blog I described the Chicken Puff Pie as a throwback to the “pot pie—without the pie crust”.  At the time I was deeply into crepes, clafoutis, and custard-based dishes and this evolved from that process. The surprising dish yielded a nutritious, creamy, and satisfying meal without all the work.

I’ve since learned that just about any leftover vegetables and complementary protein will work. Refresh them in a quick sauté with onion and herbs. A thin crepe-like batter is poured overall,  suspending the collection into something similar to a savory clafoutis.

Puff Pie glimpse

Bake the dish for 30 minutes in a hot oven until light and puffed.  Cool briefly and slice into neat wedges.

True comfort food that does not taste like leftovers and reheats beautifully…

Vegetables and Ham Puff Pie  

Most complementary precooked vegetables and protein can be substituted here. 

Ingredients
1 Tbsp butter, plus butter for baking dish
½ medium onion, peeled, small chop
1 clove garlic, divided, crushed
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded, diced
1 tsp dried herbs:  thyme, rosemary, sage
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
1 cup precooked brussels sprouts, cut in half
1 cup precooked carrots, small chunks
1 cup precooked potatoes, small chunks
1 cup or more ham cut into small chunks
Batter
½ cup all purpose flour
¼ tsp salt
3 large eggs, beaten
⅔ cup warm milk
1 clove garlic, crushed
few grinds fresh pepper
2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, grated
For top:  2 Tbsp Gruyere cheese, grated

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Butter a quiche dish, pie plate or similar baking dish.
  2. In large sauté pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion, cook to soften. Add the garlic, jalapeno if desired, herbs, salt and pepper, cook 3-4 minutes.
  3. Stir in precooked vegetables. Add the ham and cook 3-4 minutes to heat and blend flavors.
  4. Make the batter: In a medium bowl combine the flour and salt and make a well in the center.  Add the beaten eggs and begin incorporate the flour; whisk in the milk, the garlic, and a few grinds of pepper. Add the Parmesan cheese to form a thin, nearly smooth batter.
  5. Spread enough batter into the baking dish to coat the bottom, about ½ cup. Place in the hot oven and bake until the bottom is set, 4 minutes.
  6. Evenly distribute the ham and vegetables mixture over the layer of batter in the baking dish. Stir down the remaining batter and pour it evenly over the filling. Sprinkle Gruyere cheese over the top and return the dish to oven.
  7. Reduce the heat to 375°F and bake 35 to 40 minutes longer. It is done when puffed and browned around edges and the center is firm when pressed.  Yield:  4 or more servings

Cheese Cheers

This past year I delved deeper into the fascinating world of cheesemaking.  You could say it all started with the Instant Pot and the Yogurt Setting.

I was a convert once I discovered that a delicious, tangy yogurt could be had by merely filling the Instant Pot liner with milk plus a little leftover yogurt and pressing the Yogurt Setting.  Even better, I could split the yield and have yogurt plus a batch of thick rich labneh.

Cheesemaking is an addictive, ancient process.  I wondered how the first person living in a cave felt when they figured out that sour milk could result in delicious cheese.

Once I mastered yogurt I wanted to know more, too. I tinkered with fresh cheeses like paneer, ricotta, feta, mozzarella, cheese curds, queso blanco and queso fresco.  Each was its own rewarding surprise.

Along the way I gathered up essential tools and supplies—many of which I already had, like sieves, strainers and cheesecloth.  For cultures, molds and other products, New England Cheese Making Supply Co became a helpful and reliable site. They focus on education with plenty of helpful resources, recipes, and tutorials for those who are just getting started.

My latest big step was obtaining a cheese press. It opened the door to more complex cheeses  requiring a variety of processes and aging stages. My next candidate along the cheesemaking spectrum would be Caerphilly, a starter cheese from Wales known for its forgiving character and shorter aging period.

Behold! Caerphilly freshly ripened

Caerphilly is a simplified cheddar style cheese that presses at 20 pounds for 16 hours and needs only 4 to 5 weeks of aging (some cheeses age for years!).  I halved a larger recipe from a Gavin Webber video, who maintains a popular You Tube channel.

The recipe came together without incident and the new cheese press made it look like I knew what I was doing! After 3 days of drying time, it went into its ripening box to age. The Caerphilly was ready to sample in 25 days. As I cut into its pale gold rind, I was surprised to see the interior became paler and creamier toward the center and displayed its characteristic holes. The rind had a slight nuttiness; the interior was not too salty with a firm texture and mild cheddar flavor.

Caerphilly holiday cheese feature

Caerphilly is such an agreeable cheese, it goes with just about anything.  On a cheeseboard, it is the star along with a Cambozola Triple Cream blue cheese and aged Gouda.  To round out the display I tucked in sliced salami, imported olives, almonds and crackers—and rounded it out with holiday favorites, Moroccan fruitcake and cranberry sauce.

Fruitcake worth considering

Old fashion fruitcake tends to get a bad wrap due to its tooth-aching inclusion of sweet candied fruits and such.  Here’s a game changer that will get your attention and become a requested addition on any  table—especially alongside holiday specialty meats and cheeses.

When this moist, easy to assemble Moroccan fruitcake was demonstrated on Martha Bakes recently I knew wanted to give it a try. Helen Goh, baker with London’s Ottolenghi restaurants shows how easy it is to create her big flavored creation.  The cake’s complexity is rooted in a combination of plump dried fruits soaked in dark tea and given a jolt with an exotic ras el hanout spice blend.

Moroccan Fruitcake

I love everything about this bread from the jam packed assortment of figs, prunes, apricots, raisins and dates to the big flavors of toasted cumin and coriander seeds, red pepper flakes, turmeric, ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper, and paprika.

As mentioned, the secret is to soak the dried fruit in advance to fully plump and activate flavors; I prefer a fine Puer tea, but Assam is recommended.  You’ll note there is no fat used in this recipe either—and it is not missed.

Admittedly, the first time I tried a rich moist slice early in the morning I was not prepared for the impact. The distinct cumin flavors were front and center—near jarring on my sleepy taste buds.

With that in mind, I set about making the fruitcake again—this time with a modified spice blend that omitted the cumin but retained the red pepper.  I also took Goh’s suggestion to add a little whole grained flour and included ½ cup buckwheat flour. (I also swapped out self rising flour for AP flour and baking powder).

Fruitcake, take 2

Side by side, I preferred the original bread.  I missed how beautifully the bright spices and dried fruit mingled together. For personal choices, I’ve kept both options in the recipe below. This truly depends on taste and how you plan to use it.

If you wish, spread thick slices with butter, or toast it first.

Moroccan Fruitcake

Inspired by Moroccan Fruitcake as demonstrated on Martha Bakes by Helen Goh, baker from London’s Ottolenghi restaurants.

Ingredients
2½ cups dried fruit: ½ cup each diced apricots, figs, prunes or dates, raisins or cranberries
1 cup hot strong dark tea, Assam, Puer, etc.
1½ cup AP flour
2 tsp baking powder
½ tsp sea salt
2 tsp ras el hanout (see below)
¾ cup packed light brown sugar
1 large egg, lightly beaten
¼ cup milk, approximate, to thin as needed

Instructions

  1. Ahead, in medium bowl combine dried fruits, pour hot tea over all. Cover, let stand 2 hours or overnight to plump and absorb tea.
  2. Preheat oven to 375°F. Spray with nonstick baking spray and line 8 ½ x 4 ½” loaf pan with parchment with 1 ½ inch overhang.
  3. In mixing bowl, sift flour and baking powder, add salt, the spice blend, sugar, and combine.
  4. Stir in the dried fruit and any remaining liquid; add the egg and combine. Stir in milk as need to bind; it should be thick.
  5. Spoon into baking pan, bake until tester comes out clean, 50-55 minutes. Cool for 10 minutes, turn out on rack to cool.
    Slice and spread with salted butter; also good toasted. Store at room temperature well wrapped for 3 days. Serves 6-8

Note: watch for signs of early browning on top as the bread tends to burn easily. Cover with foil as needed to protect the top.

Ras el hanout

Toast 1½ tsp coriander seeds and ¾ tsp cumin seeds and grind with ½ tsp coarse sea salt.
Add ½ tsp each coarse ground black peppercorns and crushed red pepper flakes and grind. Combine mixture with ¼ tsp cinnamon, 1 tsp paprika, ½ tsp turmeric, ½ tsp dry ginger, ½ tsp cardamom. Makes about 2 Tbsp

Modified spice blend: ½ tsp coriander, ¼ tsp each cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, turmeric, and ground red pepper flakes

Cranberries Part II: The Sauce

Arguably, the holiday season would not be the same without cranberry sauce.  I sometimes balk—in a weak attempt to avoid the whole idea. No matter, eventually I buckle and make a fresh batch anyway. I can’t help myself.

Cranberries are a big crop in Oregon. With gobs of bogs scattered along our coastline there’s no excuse not to have plenty on hand.

If you’ve got the berries and time is your problem, here’s a simple cranberry sauce for you. Combine the berries, sugar, a little liquid, and pop it all in the microwave. In five minutes a luxe sauce will materialize with little effort on your behalf.  If you wish, add a little grated ginger or orange zest.

Enjoy it with toast or on hot cereal in the morning.  Dress it up with a splash of vinegar, onion or garlic, a teaspoon of ras-el-hanout or other red pepper spice blend and you’ve got handcrafted chutney (for more ideas see chutney).  It’s a festive homemade gift that’s ready when you are.

Five Minute Cranberry Sauce

Ingredients
2 cups fresh cranberries, rinsed
⅔ cup granulated sugar
¼ cup water, orange juice, or brewed Orange Spice Tea
1 tsp orange zest or grated ginger (optional)

Directions

  1. In 4-cup microwaveable glass measure or similar bowl, place cranberries, sugar, liquid and optional flavoring.
  2. Cover loosely, cook in the microwave for 5 minutes using the following sequence, taking care not to boil over: bring to a boil and cook for 2 minutes, then stir. Cover, cook 1 minute and stir again. Cover, cook for 30 seconds and stir, repeat for another 30 seconds.
  3. Berries will pop, release their liquid and thicken into a sauce. If not, repeat for 30 seconds.  Pour into storage container and refrigerate.  Yield: 1½ cups.

Cranberries, meet Apples

Ah beautiful cranberries,  ruby red jewels of the holiday season…

Courtesy Oregon Cranberry Growers Assn.

It’s too bad that cranberries tend to receive little more than a cursory nod when cast in their limited role as a wobbly sauce —several circles down from the holiday turkey.  If real lucky, they might be hung out to dry on a string draped around the Christmas tree.

I decided to give cranberries a chance, this time as a co-star with another seasonal favorite, the Honeycrisp apple (or any other sweet-crisp variety).  Anyone who has played with cranberries knows they can be quirky.  They are hard, tart, and when cooked have their own thickening power.  On the other hand, Honeycrisp apples are full of flavor, crisp, bright and juicy—they could go a long way to elevating cranberries beyond their obscure part as a bit player.

This beautiful Crostata if very similar to the Stone Fruit Galette in my Counter Cuisine cookbook.  If you have taken a look, you know that it is a hand formed pie mounded with fresh fruit. It also bakes in about 30 minutes.

Apple Cranberry Crostata

The trick here is to cook the apples and cranberries just long enough to soften them but still retain their shape and unique attributes.

Apples and near popping Cranberries

The best way to pull this off is to briefly cook the filling ahead. The hand formed pastry can be prepped ahead, too. Then, it’s a simple matter of assembling it all and baking the crostata off until bubbly and golden brown.

A little pastry with your fruit

The result: a crisp pastry bundle wrapped around a tender-fresh filling near bursting with holiday flavors.

Apple Cranberry Crostata

Ingredients
1 recipe Hand Formed Pastry (below)
1 Tbsp butter
2-3 Honeycrisp or other apples, peel, core, cut into ½” slice or chunks, @ 3 cups
1 tsp cinnamon, ½ tsp nutmeg
3 Tbsp granulated sugar
2 Tbsp brown sugar
1 orange:  1 Tbsp juice, 2 tsp zest
1 Tbsp flour
¾ to 1 cup raw cranberries
Egg wash: 1 egg yolk + 1 tsp water, 1 Tbsp granulated sugar
Glaze: 1 Tbsp melted and strained marmalade (optional)

Instructions

  1. Prepare pastry and chill at least 30 minutes, up to 2 days.
  2. For filling, heat butter in wide pan over medium. Toss in apples to coat, add the spices and sugars to melt. Add the orange zest and juice, cook 1 minute.
    Remove from heat, sprinkle flour over the fruit and gently stir to combine all. Return to medium heat and bring to a simmer. Add the cranberries, lower heat and cook 2-3 minutes, until thick and fruit just begins to soften. Remove and cool well, 1- 2 hours. Filling can be chilled and brought to room temperature before proceeding.
  3. To assemble, roll out pastry on floured parchment into 12” free formed round. Set pastry and parchment on baking sheet.
    Mound prepared filling onto pastry with slotted spoon, higher in center. Allow 2” border to fold over fruit and contain it. Brush pastry with egg wash and sprinkle with granulated sugar.
  4. Bake 375-400°F for 25-35 minutes, until filling is bubbly and pastry is golden brown. If desired, brush fruit top lightly with marmalade glaze for extra shine. Cool well. Slice and serve with vanilla ice cream. Serves 4 to 6
Hand-Formed Pastry

3  Tbsp each butter and vegetable shortening spread ½” thick, freeze 15 mins
1 cup AP flour
½ tsp salt
3-4 Tbsp ice water

Whisk flour and salt in med bowl. Dice the cold shortening and butter into ½ cubes and cut into flour with 2 knives or a pastry blender, until pieces are the size of small peas.
Add 3 Tbsp ice water and stir with a fork until the flour is moist and begins to hold together. Add a few more drops of ice water into bottom of bowl if needed. Gather up dough and gently shape into a ball and flatten into a disk. Roll out as needed or wrap each in plastic wrap. Chill up to 2 days.