Lip Smacking Good: Boston Brown Bread

As mentioned in the previous post, when March approaches I get nostalgic. Much of this is brought on by St. Paddy’s Day, since I was raised outside of Boston.  I recall it as a hugely anticipated day-long event packed with celebrations, all culminating with aromatic corned beef, cabbage, and all the trimmings.

Another much loved food from those days is irreplaceable Boston Brown Bread, a must have accompaniment with famed Boston Baked Beans. Whenever I see a brown bread recipe, I automatically save it.  I’m not sure why I collect them, because there is nothing complicated about it:  just a basic bread using baking soda for leavener, with a combination of hearty flours like rye and wheat—and of course cornmeal.  Buttermilk is the standard liquid, and molasses is a key ingredient which supplies mild sweetness along with its signature flavor. Raisins or currants are negotiable.

Boston Brown Bread is a quirky boiled/steamed bread with a history that likely goes back centuries.  In more recent times, the practice of using a coffee can as a cooking mold has become linked with its now characteristic round shape.

I must confess until this March I had never made Boston Brown Bread.  I may have been caught up in its mystic, but the idea of boiling bread in a water bath for an hour just seemed a little too remote.

That is all pre-multi-cooker.  Now, I am so smitten by the Instant Pot’s flexibility that I seek out challenges—and what a ride it gave me this past weekend. Most certainly the IP was created for Boston Brown Bread.

This is inspired by Jasper White’s Boston Brown Bread recipe, which I have adapted to the PC.  The batter is divided between two 15 ounce pinto bean cans.  It’s a good idea not to fill the tins any more than 2/3 full to allow for rising space. Cover them with foil and secure with twine.  In 30 minutes,  the loaves are ‘baked’ and beautiful.

I will not gush, but will simply state that this is a bread worth investing in a multi-cooker.  It is just as good as I remembered!   Brown bread is great warmed in the morning, spread with butter or cream cheese.  It makes a great mid-day snack, an accompaniment to many entrees, and it is lip-smacking good as an ice cream sandwich.

Boston Brown Bread, PC

Adapted from Jasper White’s Boston Brown Bread

½ cup whole wheat flour
½ cup dark rye flour
½ cup medium grind corn meal
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
1/3 cup molasses or ¼ cup molasses + 2 tablespoons apple butter
1 cup buttermilk, or a half and half combo of milk + yogurt
½ cup raisins or currants
Accessories:  2 – 15-1/2 ounce cans top and labels removed and cleaned


  1. Grease the insides of two cans with butter or baker’s spray.
  2. In multi-cooker, insert trivet and pour in about 6 cups water.  Set pot to Saute or Simmer to begin heating the water.
  3. Combine the dry ingredients with a whisk in a mixing bowl.  Stir in the liquid, then fold in the raisins.
  4. Divide the batter between the molds. It should fill molds about 2/3s full.  Secure the tops with foil and tie with twine.
  5. Place the cans into the pot, adding more water if necessary to fill ½ way up the sides of the cans.  Do not fill the pot beyond maximum capacity mark.  Set to High Pressure and cook for 30 minutes.
  6. Allow bread to rest in pot with lid sealed for 10 minutes then slowly release pressure. Test for doneness:  a skewer inserted in center should come out clean.  Transfer molds to cooling rack and remove the foil covers.  Cool for about 45 minutes before unmolding.  Yield: 2 loaves.

Ultimate Kid Food, Part 2

It is all a matter of taste, and opinions on the grilled cheese sandwich are legendary.

Folks are very picky about their sandwiches and you just don’t mess with this one. What about the cheese?  Should it have Swiss or American cheese? Or do we go off the deep end and prefer blue cheese and pears?  What about mustard?  Preferences here can run deep and strong; it’s a very hot topic, indeed.

Of course, the bread is an important factor.  Here, we begin with an inoffensive Buttermilk White Bread. It’s not too soft and not too dense. It’s a good size, not too big and not too small, but large enough to trim the crust – if an issue.

For the cheese, we stay in the middle with a compromise, and go with a slice each of Swiss and American, plus a light schmear of deli mustard in between for good luck.

The bread is lightly buttered on the exterior sides only.  That is it. Grill both sides over moderately low until crispy, golden, and gooey.Tom Soup, Grilled Cheese

Enjoy with a steamy cup of tomato soup and dip away!

Grilled Cheese Sandwich

2 slices Buttermilk white bread
1 slice Swiss cheese
1 slice American cheese
½ teaspoon deli mustard
1-2 teaspoon butter


  1. Over medium low heat, preheat grill/pan.
  2.  Spread butter on 1 side of the bread slices. Place one slice, buttered side down in pan. Layer it with Swiss cheese spread with a light schmear of mustard and then the American cheese. Top with 2nd slice of bread, buttered side up.
  3. Cook until the bread is golden brown, 2-3 minutes; turn and repeat; press and turn again until crusty and cheese is melted.  Cut off the crusts if desired, and slice into fingers or triangles.  1 serving

It’s Meatloaf | No Muss, No Fuss

Meatloaf is real comfort food, and we may have differing opinions about it. Whether we prefer it with or without ketchup—and what we like with our meatloaf can be real deal breakers.

Here’s a meatloaf solution that makes perfect sense to me. It’s a one pot meal with three separate components: a moist and succulent Italian-influenced meatloaf, smashed potatoes and cauliflower with green onions, and steamed carrots with sage butter.

There is nothing complicated here, beyond soaking the meat loaf’s bread crumbs in milk for 5 minutes—which is a crucial step in the success of this entire extravaganza.  Of course, there is a pressure cooker involved, too.

It is simply a matter of loading a layer of quartered red potatoes and cauliflower florets in the bottom of the pot with 1 cup of water.  The very basic meatloaf is assembled, formed into a ring, sprinkled with a bit of Parmesan, placed in a steamer insert, and set atop the potato layer.  Carrots are cut into fingers tossed with sage and butter, salt and pepper, folded into a foil packet and perched over the meatloaf.

The pot is brought up to pressure and it cooks for 10 minutes. Seriously.  While the meatloaf reaches its full potential its excess juices drip down and flavor the potatoes.

Once the pressure is released, the carrot packet is removed, and the steamer insert is lifted out. The potato water is drained off. The potatoes and cauliflower are quickly smashed with a bit of milk, seasoned to taste, and finished with green onions.  The meatloaf is cut into wide wedges and dinner is ready.

meatloaf combo (1)

No muss, no fuss.

meatloaf plate

It’s Meatloaf

Meatloaf, Potato-Cauliflower Mash, Sage Carrots Packet | One Pot PC

Inspired by Hip Pressure Cooking by Laura D.A. Pazzaglia

1 cup water for pot
1 pound ground beef, or a combo of meats
½ cup fine dry breadcrumbs
1 cup milk
½ onion, chop
1 clove garlic, crush
1 teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
1 egg, beaten
½ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
One pot add-on vegetables
4-5 red potatoes, quarter
1 cup cauliflower florets
½ cup milk
Salt, pepper
2 green onions, chop
3-4 carrots, peel cut into fingers
1 teaspoons butter, melted
1 teaspoon olive oil
½ teaspoon crumbled dry sage
Salt, pepper


  1. Add 1 cup water to pressure cooker insert.  Spray the stainless steel insert with non-stick cooking spray.  Cut one foil sheet approximately 12” square.
  2. For meatloaf: in mixing bowl combine dry bread crumbs and milk; soak 5 minutes to absorb liquid.
  3. Place ground beef to the bowl, add all ingredients through nutmeg and combine well.  Add the egg and combine lightly.
  4. Shape the meatloaf into a long loaf, place in steamer joining into an even ring. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.
  5. Lay the foil out flat, place carrots in center, drizzle with melted butter and oil. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and dried sage. Fold ends together to form a sealed packet.
  6. Place the potatoes and cauliflower in the water in the bottom of the liner. Place steamer basket on top with carrier handles up, if available. Rest the carrot packet on top.
  7. Lock the lid, set pressure to High and pressure valve to Sealing.  Set time for 10 minutes.  When done, allow pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes, then use Quick Release to expedite process.
  8. Remove the carrot packet and the steamer basket with meat.
  9. Remove the potatoes and cauliflower with slotted spoon to a flat bowl and mash with milk. Season with more salt and pepper if desired, and add green onions.
  10. Cut meat into wedges and serve with potato-cauliflower mash and sage carrots.  Serves 4.



Party Time

Who doesn’t love a good Reuben sandwich?  What a combination. A flavorful dressing spread on pumpernickel or rye bread and topped with layers of corned beef, sauerkraut, and Swiss cheese. It’s definitely over the top when grilled  until toasted and  the cheese is melted.

Here’s a Reuben riff that brings it into the realm of mass production for entertaining and game days.  It’s an open-faced sandwich that can be prepped ahead and run under the broiler for a last minute fix.Mini Reubens

My chief hang-up on the Reuben has always been the sandwich spread, with a definite thumbs down on sweet ones, like Thousand Island and most Russian dressings.  A simple solution is to go with a straight forward, unadulterated combination of mayonnaise and sriracha with a little minced green onion for interest.

For maximum compatibility, serve these tasty morsels with sour dill pickles and crunchy sweet potato chips.

Open-Faced Mini Reubens

1 loaf cocktail rye or pumpernickel bread
2/3 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon sriracha sauce
1 green onion, minced
3/4 pound thinly sliced corned beef
1-1/2 cups sauerkraut, rinse and drain well
3/4 pound sliced Swiss cheese
Garnish:  ½ cup chopped dill pickle or gherkins


  1. For dressing: blend the mayonnaise and other ingredients and set aside.
  2. Preheat broiler. Set rack about 6” from top.
  3. Warm the sauerkraut. Slice the corned beef into 1-1/2” strips to fold neatly across the rye. Cut the Swiss cheese slices into quarters.
  4. Arrange cocktail rye slices on a baking sheet. Spread each slice liberally with a heaping teaspoon of dressing. Fold the corned beef in 2-3 layers over the bread. Drape a forkful of sauerkraut across the corned beef. Cover the sauerkraut with 2 pieces of Swiss cheese.
  5. Run the open-faced Reubens under the broiler for about 3 minutes, until the cheese is melted and bubbly. Sprinkle with chopped pickle if desired and serve warm. Yield: 36 or more pieces



Danger Ahead

The convenience of having soft spreadable butter within arm’s reach is a wonderful thing, especially when warm bread is around.  But, it can be hazardous to ones health.  I only say that as a friendly reminder to those of us who received butter crocks for Christmas.

For anyone unfamiliar with this cleaver amenity, the butter is suspended in water as a way of preserving it at room temperature for up to 30 days.  This is not a new idea.  For centuries folks have known this to be a welcome safety method when refrigeration was not an option.

According to the Butter Bell website, this is their explanation:

The French have benefited by this practice, and I say, if it’s good enough for them, it’s good enough for me.  To a degree.  Perhaps they are able to show more restraint than I.  It’s important to regularly sample my butter, I reason, to make certain of its creamy texture and delicate flavor, and that is it is soft, spreadable, and safe.

Now, I am looking for French and imported butters, purely for comparison purposes, you understand.

It’s my job to know these things.  I am completely smitten by my new butter crock and reason this is all purely educational. 

Which also means that the butter is bypassing my hips and waist at this time. No matter, I tell myself.  It’s the holidays.


Friday Night Special

There are times when admittedly, my meals are a little wacky.  They can be downright self- indulgent and make little sense to others.  Especially on Friday nights.

It’s the end of the official work week and it’s time to relax. There are no rules!  My refrigerator looks deranged with a mere mishmash of odds and ends and pathetic leftovers. Since I will likely do a grocery shop over the weekend, I resist a stop—and prefer to pass on fast foods.

In my experience, there’s always a pizza in the works. Like another stand-by, the taco, a few toppings can become a full meal.  To that end, I like to stock at least one pan-size portion of pizza dough in the freezer. It easily defrosts in the microwave and is ready to go in no time. Occasionally, I have even stashed a pre-baked crust in the freezer. It’s a matter of gathering up a few compatible toppings and tucking it all in the oven for a quick bake.

That was the situation this past Friday night, between Christmas and New Year’s. Thanks to the holidays, my fridge was ripe pickings for fabulous toppings. No pathetic odds and ends here; I had a little hard Spanish chorizo, a collection of fontina and other cheeses, pasilla peppers, sweet onion, Greek dried olives and — fresh green tomatillos.

Tomatillo Sauce 1Whatever.  I treated the 8 tomatillos as if they were treasured San Marzano tomatoes. I removed their husks, chopped them up, and made a fast sauce with onion, garlic, jalapeno, oregano. I simmered it briefly, then ran the immersion blender through it until thick and cohesive. The results: a light, bright sauce worthy of this splendid occasion.

Turns out, the sparkling sauce brought all of these disparate characters together.

The final topping was another gift that kept on giving, too.  I had a little cheese mixture left from making stuffed mushrooms earlier in the week: a combination of shredded mozzarella, Parmesan, green onion, garlic, herbs and Panko. These amazing bread crumbs kept the stuffing light, absorbed moisture, and allowed for a beautifully browned top. Who knew it would one day end up on my pizza?


It’s another Friday Night Special…  and that’s the way it goes.

Friday Night Pizza

1 pizza crust
Tomatillo Sauce
2 tablespoon olive oil
½ onion, chopped
1 jalapeno pepper, partially seed, chop
2 cloves garlic, crushed
½ teaspoon dried oregano
8 fresh tomatillos, husk and chop
½ teaspoon.dried thyme (or Herbes de Provence if available)
½ cup chicken bouillon
Salt and pepper to taste
1 pasilla pepper, seed and cut into strips
½ cup hard Spanish chorizo, cut up
½ smoked ham chunks (if available)
½ sweet onion, cut into strips
A handful of dried Greek olives, or other
1 handful shredded fontina cheese
1 cup cheese combo: mozzarella, parmesan, green onion, garlic and @ ¼ cup Panko
Dried oregano


  1. For Tomatillo Sauce: in saucepan over medium heat, add olive oil and sauté the onion until soft. Add the pepper and stir, then the garlic and allow to cook until aromatic.  Add the dried herbs, then stir in the chopped tomatillos.  Just barely cover with chicken bouillon and allow to simmer until thick, about 7 minutes.  With immersion blender, whirl until the sauce is thick, cohesive and still has texture.
  2. Prebake pizza crust at 425° in lower 1/3 of oven to set, about 7 minutes.
  3. To assemble: cover the crust with a coating of some of the sauce. Top with a layer of green pepper, then the meat selection, the onion, olives, and cheese.
  4. Sprinkle with dried oregano and bake another 12 minutes or until browned and bubbly. Cut into portions and serve hot.  Serves 2.



Pizza Margarita in a Skillet: Faster than Dominos can Deliver

When using the very best ingredients it’s hard to beat a great combination like fresh mozzarella, vine ripened tomatoes, and basil leaves.  Add any other specialty touches like a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, and you have the makings of a masterpiece.

Throw in a fine crispy bread and you will know why Pizza Margarita has long been considered one of the world’s great classics.

Last night I experienced such good fortune when I happened to have fabulous fresh bread dough—as well as all the above ingredients.  Easily, within ten minutes I was slicing into world class pizza.

I had a supply of excellent bread dough on hand thanks to local bread expert Marc Green, who has perfected his own no-knead bread for artisan bread baking.  With that in mind, I pulled out a heavy skillet and heated a good drizzle of olive oil. I flattened and patted out a portion of Marc’s dough, threw it into the hot pan, and covered it with a lid to create an impromptu oven.

Meanwhile, I gathered up pre-sliced mozzarella, thinly sliced fresh tomato, and plucked a few sprigs of basil off my doorstep plant. When the bottom was crispy, I gave it a flip and added my toppings.  It was quickly covered and left to cook for another 3-5 minutes, until the cheese melted and the bottom was golden brown.

Since my dough was well constructed and robust, it raised beautifully, much like a Chicago-style pizza.  Normally I prefer a thinner crust, but this was so good I nearly polished off the whole thing without stopping for a salad!

Given this simple technique, there is no reason why any other bread or ready-made pizza dough would not work.  I also sprinkled on red pepper flakes and sea salt but that’s a personal thing. Simply nothing else is required.  Not even a phone call or text message.

Pizza Margarita in a Skillet

Inspired by Marc Green’s No-Knead Bread

one recipe bread dough
fresh sliced tomato
fresh sliced mozzarella
fresh basil leaves
olive oil


  1. Turn raised, room temperature dough out onto lightly floured surface. Lightly dust with flour and cut into four or more portions and shape into balls.
  2. Heat a medium skillet (8” approx.), heat 1-2 tablespoons oil into bottom until it shimmers. Flatten one ball with hand and press into the diameter of the skillet; carefully slide the dough into pan.
  3. Cover with a lid and cook 3 minutes until golden brown on bottom and dough has risen, uncover and carefully flip over.
  4. Place the tomato slices, mozzarella slices, and basil leaves on top of the dough.  Cover with lid and cook 3-5 minutes longer until cheese is melted and bottom is golden brown.   Remove to cutting board, cut into wedges and serve hot.  Repeat pizzas as needed.