Kid’s Play: Petite Banana Bread Panibois

I’ve been going small lately.  After years of resizing recipes upwards of 50+ servings, this is clearly a novel situation.

Banana bread slices

Petite Quality Control

Baking small may be a new world for me, but it is far more efficient and less energy wasteful, thanks to my recent purchase of a mini convection oven that is big enough to hold a 9” pizza (just sayin’).

BD toaster oven

Mini convection oven

Turns out, the new Black and Decker countertop oven is ideal for tasks like baking two petite loaves of banana bread―yielding a sweet gift in hand for a lucky friend and a perfect quality control loaf for moi.

I felt like a kid again playing with an Easy-Bake toy oven.  In the same spirit, I kept it simple by using a basic quick bread recipe that requires no special tools.

As with most quick breads, the dry and wet ingredients are combined separately then quickly mixed together. However, I did change up the oil by substituting half melted coconut oil; a very nice touch.  For a sparkling flourish I sprinkled the tops with a dusting of Demerara sugar.  Kid’s play, for sure.

Banana panibous

Banana Bread Panibois

Panibois wooden molds are a handy solution for dressing up those spur of the moment acts of kindness.  Technobake offers a full line with all sorts of sizes and shapes.  They are so attractive I keep an extra woven tray on my desk to hold daily action items.  Even better news, you bake right in the molds, since each includes a paper liner for added protection.

Come to think of it, it’s time to re-order, holiday gift giving is coming up fast…

Petite Banana Bread

Makes two 5×3” loaves

Ingredients
1 cup all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp ground nutmeg
¼ tsp salt
1 cup mashed ripe bananas (about 2 medium/large)
1 large egg
4 Tbsp vegetable oil (part melted coconut oil is nice)
1/2 cup heaping, packed brown sugar
1 ½ tsp vanilla extract

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. If using metal pans, spray with baking spray and line bottoms with parchment.
  2. In large mixing bowl, combine dry ingredients through salt and whisk to blend.
  3. In medium bowl, mash banana, whisk in egg, then the oil; add the brown sugar and whisk until smooth.  Stir in the vanilla.
  4. Stir the banana mixture into the dry ingredients just to combine.  Spread into two 5×3” loaf pans.  Sprinkle with Demerara sugar if desired.
  5. Bake for 45-50 minutes, or until the loaves begin to shrink away from edges of pan, are nicely browned, and the centers are dry when tested. (Since these brown quickly, I reduced the heat to 340 degrees half way through to insure they were thoroughly baked). Let cool for 10 minutes on rack, turn out of pan and cool to room temperature.    Yield: two 5×3” loaves.
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About Bananas, Psychologically Speaking

I don’t know about you, but I seem to constantly struggle with too many over-ripe bananas. After all these years, you’d think I would have figured out how to realistically manage the inflow and outflow of bananas.  Maybe a life-cycle chart would help.  Or perhaps there’s an app that can tell me when to buy more bananas.

Try as I might, I can’t quite get the purchase and consumption of bananas to come out even.  There are times at the market when I will hover over them, remind self of the likely outcome, then staunchly throw my head back and move on―empty handed.

Just as often though, I will linger over the bananas a tad too long. I’ll pick up a bunch and feel the surge of tension―I have more at home but I’m buying them anyway.  I refuse to accept that there will be dark bananas days ahead.

I tell myself past-their-prime bananas are good.  I should be grateful.

Border-line Bananas

Border-line Bananas

They are sweeter and more nutritious than their younger, firmer predecessors, especially in smoothies and other juice drinks.  We know they are richer in potassium, which helps with high blood pressure, osteoporosis and stroke; they have increased vitamin B-6 which lessens rheumatoid arthritis, depression and heart disease; and they contain plenty of soluble and insoluble fibers, helpful in preventing obesity and hypertension.

Nevertheless, those same youthful bananas continue to sit, gain spots, and grow black.  Likely as not, they will be relegated to the freezer, deferred for another day.  Recently, I was back in that same predicament: what to do with more sagging bananas. Here’s my latest solution for 2 (just) small very ripe bananas.  Good news: it continues to keep on giving for several days, long enough to stop buying bananas for a while.

This Banana Swirl Bread is inspired by Banana Cinnamon Bread at Goodeats.com.  It’s as close as you can get to easy banana-scented cinnamon rolls – but instead of the usual heavy dose of butter there’s only a dash of olive oil.

Banana Swirl BreadLike most yeast breads, there is the rising time to consider. The dough is so well constructed I didn’t even bother to pull out my mixer and opted to stir it up by hand.

Once it has risen the dough rolls out in a flash; it’s sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar and shaped into a loaf for another quick rise.

While the bread bakes, the air is filled with scents of tropical bananas and cinnamon―an unbeatable combination.  The hardest part is waiting for the bread to cool before cutting.  It slices beautifully revealing a gorgeous, pale yellow loaf etched throughout with a cinnamon-brown sugar spiral.

It is delicious sliced and eaten straight up, but there are those who will want to toast it and further glorify it with butter.  I suspect it would make amazing French toast, too. Stay tuned for Episode Two.

Banana Swirl Bread

Inspired by Donna Currie’s Bread Baking:  Banana Cinnamon Bread at  www.seriouseats.com

Ingredients

½ cup lukewarm water
1 packet quick rise yeast
½ cup mashed very ripe bananas (2 small)
¼ cup sugar
¼ cup plain yogurt, Greek-style preferably
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp vanilla extract
2-3/4 cup bread flour or all purpose flour; divided
1 Tbsp olive oil
Cinnamon-sugar
½ cup brown sugar
1 tbsp cinnamon

Directions 

  1. In large mixing bowl, combine the warm water, the yeast, and a pinch of the sugar; let stand about 10 minutes to activate yeast and become bubbly.
  2. Meanwhile, mash the bananas and add to them the remaining sugar, yogurt, salt, vanilla and a heaping cup of the flour. Combine and add to the yeast mixture, stirring to incorporate.   Add another heaping cup of flour (reserving the rest for the kneading process) along with the olive oil and continue mixing until it forms a smooth mass.  If using a bread hook, continue to beat and incorporate most of the flour until it is smooth and elastic.
  3. If finishing by hand, turn dough out onto floured board, kneading briefly to incorporate remainder of the flour and the dough is silky and elastic.
  4. Place the dough in clean, well oiled bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover, and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 1 hour.
  5. Meanwhile spray a 9×5” or similar pan with oil. Combine the brown sugar and cinnamon and set aside.
  6. When dough is light, flour the board, turn it out, punch it down and knead it briefly to release air. Roll the dough out to 9”x15” rectangle.  Spread the cinnamon-sugar evenly over the dough, leaving a 3” unsugared edge on the far 9” end.
  7. Roll the dough up, jelly roll fashion, to form a 9” long log. Pinch the unsugared end and seal. Tuck the ends under if necessary and place seam-side down in prepared pan.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.
  8. Preheat oven to 325 degrees and bake for 35-40 minutes until golden brown, rotating to brown evenly if necessary. Remove loaf from pan and cool completely on rack before cutting.  Yield:  1 loaf.

Bananas for Blondies

Blondies.  Are they nothing more than brownies missing their chocolate?

I suspect that simplistic notion comes from the brownie loyalists:  a faction that believes brownies belong in a category by themselves. For them, a good brownie is no more than chocolate sullied with a bit of flour, sugar, and egg to keep it together.

It is pointless to try and sway the chocoholics of the world into considering much beyond hard core chocolate; they are quite happy with their lot.

But for those of us who appreciate full-flavored blondies and the possibilities they suggest, there are plenty of options, like coconut-chai, peanut butter, raspberry swirl, or pumpkin blondie.

Or, how about a banana blondie?  There is the prerequisite flour and eggs, but it also includes browned butter, brown and granulated sugars, plus it’s moistened further with a couple of ripe bananas and laced with a touch of nutmeg―then it is all finished with a buttermilk glaze and candied-spiced pecans.Banana Blondies A

Perhaps not addictive, but certainly delicious: tropical undertones, caramel complexity, nuanced and nutty, reminiscent of buttermilk doughnut… more than a non-brownie.

Banana Blondies with Buttermilk Glaze

Ingredients
2 1/4   cups  flour
3/4      tsp  nutmeg
1          tsp  baking powder
1/2      tsp salt
10       Tbsp unsalted butter, room temperature
3/4     cup granulated sugar
3/4     cup light brown sugar
2         large ripe bananas, cut up
2          eggs
2         tsp  vanilla
Buttermilk Glaze
3/4      cup sugar
1/4      tsp  salt
1/3      cup  buttermilk
2        Tbsp  butter
1       Tbsp corn syrup
1/2    tsp vanilla
1      cup  candied pecans or walnuts (4 oz)  lightly chopped

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line and spray 9×13″ pan.  Position rack in lower 1/3 of oven.
  2. Combine and whisk dry ingredients and set aside.
  3.  Melt the butter until it is bubbly and slightly nutty; in mixer, combine butter and sugars.  Beat in banana until smooth.  Add eggs one at a time, scrape down bowl and add vanilla.
  4. With spatula, stir in flour mixture; do not beat.  Spoon into pan, spread gently.
  5. Bake for about 30 minutes, until top is light brown and tester comes out clean.  Pour the Glaze over hot blondies.  Yield:  18 approx.

Glaze:  In a small pan, bring all to a boil except vanilla; reduce heat and simmer 5 minutes. Remove from heat and add vanilla.  Pour evenly over hot blondies. Sprinkle candied nuts over the moist glaze.

Allow to cool completely before cutting.  Store covered at room temp for 3 days, or freeze up to 3 months without nuts.