Forget Dinner

I should have known better. I did not expect much, and I was wrong. Maria Speck’s book Ancient Grains for Modern Meals has been a reliable resource in my kitchen for quite a while now, and it has rarely let me down.

It’s one of those recipes I have considered on several occasions but moved on, opting for something else. Perhaps it is because she offers it as primarily a breakfast dish—and it needs an overnight soak. Apparently, I have trouble thinking that far ahead.  Sad.

Maria calls it an Anise Oatmeal Puff.  That sounds interesting. But then she adds an egg, clearly something I’ve had difficulty imagining. Well, for anyone who is a rice pudding fan, take another look.  You receive all the instant gratification, plus it’s made more nutritious with oats.

Maria and her family must surely like it, because her recipe makes enough for 8 stand-alone servings.  This morning I decided to test her idea. I would resize the dry mix and forgo the prescribed overnight soak method.

It’s another microwave wonder:  true bliss in under 5 minutes. Tasty, filling, entertaining, and fast. In fact, I would even make this for dinner—or dessert—and forget dinner.

In all fairness to Maria, I offer her original recipe from sister book Simply Ancient Grains, because it is probably worth making in batches and investing in the overnight soak.  However, if you are like me, and in your first excursion would prefer to pass on the wait, those adjustments also follow.

Anise Oatmeal Puff

Inspiration from Simply Ancient Grains, Maria Speck
 
Ingredients
Dry Oatmeal Mix – 8 servings
2 cups old fashion rolled oats or rolled grains
2/3 cup golden raisins or dried cranberries
1 teaspoon crushed anise or fennel seeds
1-1/4 teaspoon baking powder

Oatmeal Puff – per serving
1//3 – 1/2 cup milk
1 tablespoon maple, agave, or other syrup
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 egg
A few grapes or other fruit such as fresh pear or apple, dried cranberries, dates or prunes
Powdered or cinnamon sugar for dusting, optional

Directions
Prepare the dry oatmeal mix and combine well.  Store airtight.
Allow per serving:

  1. The night before: In microwave safe mug or bowl place 1/3 cup dry oat mix with milk, syrup and vanilla. Cover and chill.
  2. The next morning: In a small bowl beat the egg with a fork until well blended.  Stir it into the mug mixture to combine.  Stir in 3-4 grapes or other fruit.
  3. Place mug in microwave and cook on high 1 minute 20 seconds – it will rise possibly above the rim, but will not spill over. It is done when a skewer inserted comes out clean.  Cook 10 seconds and test.  Let set a few minutes to firm up.  Top with more grapes, dust with cinnamon and serve.

Individual Anise Oatmeal Puff recipe for 1, without overnight soak

  1. In an ovenproof mug combine:
    1/3 cup quick oats
    1 tablespoon dried fruit: cranberries etc.
    Pinch crumbled anise seeds
    Scant 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  2. Add to the oats and mix well:
    1/3 cup milk
    1 tablespoon agave, maple, or other syrup
    Dash almond or vanilla extract
  3. To expedite soaking, warm mixture in microwave for about 40 seconds, stirring every 20 seconds to absorb some of the liquid and expand the oats, but not thoroughly heat.
  4. Beat 1 egg and incorporate in the oat mixture.
  5. Microwave a total of 1 minute and 20 seconds. Half way, rotate the cup for even rising. It is done when a pick or narrow knife inserted in center comes out nearly clean. Let rest about 3 minutes to set up.
  6. Top with a few fresh berries. If desired, sprinkle with powdered or cinnamon sugar.

A budding chef with egg on face

This is my first cooking memory:

I was close to 7-years-old, spending unsupervised time at my friend Jane’s house, whose grandmother lived next door.  We decided we would try our hand at cooking eggs-in-a-nest.  We figured that we could start them on the stove, skip over to her granny’s house, and  then dash back.  That should keep us busy and allow just enough time for the eggs and bread to cook before turning.

There was a lot of running back and forth that day, but no one seemed to mind.  I can still smell and hear the butter and eggs sizzling in the pan.  As in life, timing is everything, and to our delight we could run plenty fast enough. We even mastered the flipping process: the first were a little dicey, but we soon got the hang of it.

Of course, Jane and I didn’t bother to sit down and eat, we were too excited, and too busy.  As we stood there, with egg dribbling down on our faces, we were in heaven.  We had discovered one of life’s greatest joys, the gift of cooking and sharing our lot with others.

Egg-in-a-Nest
Egg-in-a-Nest

 Egg-in-a-Nest

1 slice of favorite bread, with the center cut out
1 large fresh egg
butter, softened
salt and pepper

Using a small skillet over medium heat, butter the bread on both sides and place the two pieces in the skillet.  Move the bread a bit to coat the pan with butter where the egg will sit.  When the pan is hot drop in the egg.

Fry the bread and egg; when the white is firmly set and the bread is nicely toasted on bottom, gently flip it with a spatula.  Make sure the pan has a coating of butter where the egg will rest.  Cook second side until bread is toasted and egg is cooked to your liking; salt and pepper, and serve.  Yield: 1 serving.