Behold, leftovers!

This year, Christmas dinner had its challenges.  With lockdown in place for many of us, we faced a different holiday meal, one without the shared comfort and joy of extended family and friends.

Not terribly hungry, I ended up roasting a supply of vegetables: brussels sprouts, carrots and potatoes. When ready I topped it with sliced ham, a mustard glaze and baked until bubbly. It got the job done—without much flash or flare.  My heart really wasn’t in it.

Pending leftovers

Holidays meals often translate to future soups, stews and snacks.  The uninspired leftovers lingered in the fridge for a couple of days before I considered what to do with them.  I mulled over the possibilities: soup and such just didn’t seem to fit here. Then I recalled a delicious dish that would create a cohesive meal out of all this with little effort on my part.

In a 2014 blog I described the Chicken Puff Pie as a throwback to the “pot pie—without the pie crust”.  At the time I was deeply into crepes, clafoutis, and custard-based dishes and this evolved from that process. The surprising dish yielded a nutritious, creamy, and satisfying meal without all the work.

I’ve since learned that just about any leftover vegetables and complementary protein will work. Refresh them in a quick sauté with onion and herbs. A thin crepe-like batter is poured overall,  suspending the collection into something similar to a savory clafoutis.

Puff Pie glimpse

Bake the dish for 30 minutes in a hot oven until light and puffed.  Cool briefly and slice into neat wedges.

True comfort food that does not taste like leftovers and reheats beautifully…

Vegetables and Ham Puff Pie  

Most complementary precooked vegetables and protein can be substituted here. 

Ingredients
1 Tbsp butter, plus butter for baking dish
½ medium onion, peeled, small chop
1 clove garlic, divided, crushed
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded, diced
1 tsp dried herbs:  thyme, rosemary, sage
½ tsp salt
¼ tsp pepper
1 cup precooked brussels sprouts, cut in half
1 cup precooked carrots, small chunks
1 cup precooked potatoes, small chunks
1 cup or more ham cut into small chunks
Batter
½ cup all purpose flour
¼ tsp salt
3 large eggs, beaten
⅔ cup warm milk
1 clove garlic, crushed
few grinds fresh pepper
2 Tbsp Parmesan cheese, grated
For top:  2 Tbsp Gruyere cheese, grated

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Butter a quiche dish, pie plate or similar baking dish.
  2. In large sauté pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the onion, cook to soften. Add the garlic, jalapeno if desired, herbs, salt and pepper, cook 3-4 minutes.
  3. Stir in precooked vegetables. Add the ham and cook 3-4 minutes to heat and blend flavors.
  4. Make the batter: In a medium bowl combine the flour and salt and make a well in the center.  Add the beaten eggs and begin incorporate the flour; whisk in the milk, the garlic, and a few grinds of pepper. Add the Parmesan cheese to form a thin, nearly smooth batter.
  5. Spread enough batter into the baking dish to coat the bottom, about ½ cup. Place in the hot oven and bake until the bottom is set, 4 minutes.
  6. Evenly distribute the ham and vegetables mixture over the layer of batter in the baking dish. Stir down the remaining batter and pour it evenly over the filling. Sprinkle Gruyere cheese over the top and return the dish to oven.
  7. Reduce the heat to 375°F and bake 35 to 40 minutes longer. It is done when puffed and browned around edges and the center is firm when pressed.  Yield:  4 or more servings

It’s Meatloaf | No Muss, No Fuss

Meatloaf is real comfort food, and we may have differing opinions about it. Whether we prefer it with or without ketchup—and what we like with our meatloaf can be real deal breakers.

Here’s a meatloaf solution that makes perfect sense to me. It’s a one pot meal with three separate components: a moist and succulent Italian-influenced meatloaf, smashed potatoes and cauliflower with green onions, and steamed carrots with sage butter.

There is nothing complicated here, beyond soaking the meat loaf’s bread crumbs in milk for 5 minutes—which is a crucial step in the success of this entire extravaganza.  Of course, there is a pressure cooker involved, too.

It is simply a matter of loading a layer of quartered red potatoes and cauliflower florets in the bottom of the pot with 1 cup of water.  The very basic meatloaf is assembled, formed into a ring, sprinkled with a bit of Parmesan, placed in a steamer insert, and set atop the potato layer.  Carrots are cut into fingers tossed with sage and butter, salt and pepper, folded into a foil packet and perched over the meatloaf.

The pot is brought up to pressure and it cooks for 10 minutes. Seriously.  While the meatloaf reaches its full potential its excess juices drip down and flavor the potatoes.

Once the pressure is released, the carrot packet is removed, and the steamer insert is lifted out. The potato water is drained off. The potatoes and cauliflower are quickly smashed with a bit of milk, seasoned to taste, and finished with green onions.  The meatloaf is cut into wide wedges and dinner is ready.

meatloaf combo (1)

No muss, no fuss.

meatloaf plate
It’s Meatloaf

Meatloaf, Potato-Cauliflower Mash, Sage Carrots Packet | One Pot PC

Inspired by Hip Pressure Cooking by Laura D.A. Pazzaglia

Ingredients
1 cup water for pot
Meatloaf
1 pound ground beef, or a combo of meats
½ cup fine dry breadcrumbs
1 cup milk
½ onion, chop
1 clove garlic, crush
1 teaspoon sea salt
½ teaspoon ground black pepper
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
1 egg, beaten
½ cup Parmesan cheese, grated
One pot add-on vegetables
4-5 red potatoes, quarter
1 cup cauliflower florets
½ cup milk
Salt, pepper
2 green onions, chop
3-4 carrots, peel cut into fingers
1 teaspoons butter, melted
1 teaspoon olive oil
½ teaspoon crumbled dry sage
Salt, pepper

Directions

  1. Add 1 cup water to pressure cooker insert.  Spray the stainless steel insert with non-stick cooking spray.  Cut one foil sheet approximately 12” square.
  2. For meatloaf: in mixing bowl combine dry bread crumbs and milk; soak 5 minutes to absorb liquid.
  3. Place ground beef to the bowl, add all ingredients through nutmeg and combine well.  Add the egg and combine lightly.
  4. Shape the meatloaf into a long loaf, place in steamer joining into an even ring. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.
  5. Lay the foil out flat, place carrots in center, drizzle with melted butter and oil. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and dried sage. Fold ends together to form a sealed packet.
  6. Place the potatoes and cauliflower in the water in the bottom of the liner. Place steamer basket on top with carrier handles up, if available. Rest the carrot packet on top.
  7. Lock the lid, set pressure to High and pressure valve to Sealing.  Set time for 10 minutes.  When done, allow pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes, then use Quick Release to expedite process.
  8. Remove the carrot packet and the steamer basket with meat.
  9. Remove the potatoes and cauliflower with slotted spoon to a flat bowl and mash with milk. Season with more salt and pepper if desired, and add green onions.
  10. Cut meat into wedges and serve with potato-cauliflower mash and sage carrots.  Serves 4.

 

Super Bowl Creamer Potatoes, Locally Sourced

If you have had a chance to shop mega supermarkets in other states, then you have experienced the buying power these large chains wield: Publix in Florida or HEB in Texas, for example. Prices may be low, but since their distribution networks are constantly working in mind-boggling quantities, they rely on the largest producers to grow and deliver the goods.

At a mega market, meeting the person that grew your herbs or picked your carrots is like winning the lottery. But even in sprawling metro areas, that possibility does exist when you seek out local markets with local connections and farmers’ markets where growers stand behind the food they grow.

baby carrots (640x450) Roths produce

As with farm stands in more rural areas, you can meet and talk with the real faces actively involved in the growing process. They are committed and they know that a happy customer will return.

The same is true with small batch bakers, artisans, craftsmen, and local markets vested in supporting local growers.   In Oregon, we are fortunate to have a reliable group of independent grocers who make it their business to know and support local producers. There are many, but in the mid-Willamette Valley, Roth’s has been taking care of their neighbors since 1962.

A recent find at our neighborhood market: colorful creamer potatoes.

fresh creamers, rosemarysmashers(640x480)
Available pretty much year round, red, purple, and white creamer potatoes are young immature potatoes averaging about 1″ in diameter. They are thin skinned with a high moisture content yielding flesh with creamy texture and flavor.

Just in time for Super Bowl 50, these smashed creamers were a big hit:  informal individual bites, perfect companion to chicken wings and other hearty snacks. Dab a little blue cheese dressing on top, if you’ve included it!

Smashed Creamer Potatoes

Inspired by from Sarah Copeland’s Feast

Ingredients
1 lb. purple, red and/or white creamer potatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
fine sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1 Tbsp. fresh fresh rosemary
5 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced thickly

Directions

  1. Place the potatoes in a pot of salted water to cover; bring to a boil over medium high heat. Cook until tender when poked with a fork, about 20 minutes. Drain and let the potatoes cool, then pat dry and toss lightly with olive oil.  On a cutting board, flatten with a chef’s knife or small flat pan.
  2. Preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  3. Move the potatoes to a lightly oiled baking sheet and drizzle with more olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, fresh rosemary and garlic. Roast at 450° for 20-25 minutes, turning with spatula after 10 minutes.  Serves 3-4