A Lovely Bunch of Radishes, Part 3

Yes, this is Part 3 of an impromptu radish series.  It all started with the discovery of the incredible Easter Egg radishes at my local grocery store.

Now I’m onto sprouting own crop of radish seeds. Sprouts day 1Since radishes are one of the fastest growing vegetables, I theorize they must be candidates for fast sprouting. Besides, their peppery bite makes them one of the current darlings of the sprout world. With all the rumbles of their healthful virtues, I’m ready to have my own supply of radish sprouts on hand for summer salads, blended drinks, and more.

For my small test batch, I’m using organic seeds designed for sprouting, rather than an off-the-shelf garden variety.  Who knows what chemicals may have been used in their processing?

The good news is that in only four days I have successfully grown my own lush, green, ready to eat radish sprouts. Sprouts day 4  Here’s a handy review:

  1. Rinse about 3 tablespoons of seeds and let them soak in water for 4 to 6 hours.
  2. Drain the seeds, rinse and drain again, and place in a quart sized sprouting jar. If not available, use a 3-4 cup mason jar with a double layer of cheese cloth covering the top and held in place with the lid’s band portion.  This will allow for circulation.  Store in a cool semi-lit area such as a cabinet or pantry.
  3. Rinse and drain 2-3 times per day until well sprouted. On day 3 or 4, move to indirect sunlight and allow chlorophyll to form and green up nicely.

That’s all there is to it.  In only four days you, too, can enjoy a lovely bunch of radish sprouts!

 

 

 

 

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A Lovely Bunch of Radishes, Part 2

Anyone who has had a radish right out of the garden knows that a radish needs very little else; maybe a little salt to emphasize its flavor, but it’s hard to improve on perfection.  Perhaps strange to Americans, the French love their radishes with butter.

Here’s a variation on a tea sandwich that bumps that idea up a little bit more.  Use a good firm bread such as a baguette, rye, or pumpernickel sliced fairly thin—this is merely a platform for the radish.  Make a quick herb butter and spread it across the top of each bread slice.Baguette_herb butter

Layer on thinly sliced radishes and sprinkle with a few radish sprout leaves or more fresh herbs. Leave them open faced to enjoy the radish’s simple beauty, or top with a second slice of buttered bread for enclosed sandwiches.  Either way, just looking at them is enough to cause your fingers to travel in their direction!Radish teas

Serve anywhere you would enjoy bread with a hit of healthful crunch: with soup, salad, as a snack with drinks, or straight out of the garden.

Radish and Herb Butter Sandwiches

Ingredients
10   slices firm bread, such as baguette, rye, or pumpernickel
6     radishes, thinly sliced
Sprout leaves for garnish
Sea salt
Herb Butter
3         tablespoons butter, room temperature
2         teaspoon parsley
1/2      teaspoon thyme, minced
1/4      teaspoon lemon juice
1/4      teaspoon sea salt

Directions

  1. Prepare the herb butter:  combine butter with herbs, a squeeze of lemon juice, and salt to taste.
  2.  Slice the radishes thinly.
  3. To assemble: spread the top of each bread slice with herb butter.  Layer with radishes, top with sprouts if available.   Serve with a sprinkling of sea salt.

A Lovely Bunch of Radishes

At the market recently a spectacular bunch of radishes caught my eye. They looked so freshly picked and perky—as if they had just been uprooted, given a quick rinse, and perched on the shelf.  These weren’t your typical tired little radishes, they were massive, brilliant globes of color ranging from white to deep magenta.

Easter Egg Radishes

Easter Egg Radishes

Their name, Easter Egg radish suits them well. I wondered, were these all show? Sometimes large varieties concentrate all their energy on producing size and can be bland, perhaps pithy. But, the price was right, so I took a gamble.

I couldn’t wait to head home and try one with a dusting of sea salt. Ah, yes, they were crunchy-crisp and mild—I immediately imagined them in a lentil salad made with firm, gorgeous le puys.

Once the lentils were cooked and cooled, about 30 minutes later, I added a drizzle of dressing and a smattering of fresh herbs, a handful of feta cheese, a little zip of preserved lemon (of course, you have some waiting in the fridge from the posting here), and folded in the chilled radishes.Lentil radish salad(870x1024)

Serve the salad at room temperature or lightly chilled. If made ahead and refrigerated, it will hold 2 to 3 days. It’s filling enough for a lazy light meal or in tandem with chilled shrimp or grilled salmon and a squeeze of fresh lemon.

Lentil Radish Salad

Ingredients
2 cups cooked le puy lentils
1 cup sliced radishes, or cut into wedges
½ cup feta cheese, crumbled
1/4 cup toasted walnuts, chopped
2 green onions, trimmed and sliced
1 tablespoon minced fresh herbs: any, or a combination of thyme, marjoram, parsley
1 tablespoon capers, or preserved lemon rind, well chopped
Dressing
4 tablespoons wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1/3 cup olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Rinse 1 cup lentils and simmer in 2 cups water for 20 minutes until soft but still firm; drain and cool. Combine the dressing; whisk or shake well, and set it aside.
In a bowl combine all ingredients, add enough dressing to coat well, and toss lightly. Serve at room temperature or chill.  Serves 4 or more.